9:24 pm - Tue, Apr 22, 2014

J Dilla Give Em What They Want | The Diary

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Dilla set out in 2002 to record an album collaborating with his favorite producers, and Supa Dave West was among them. The first two vocal tracks on this record are built around the same lyrics – “Give ‘Em What They Want” produced by Dilla and “The Doe” produced by West are typical of how he would re-record a track, changing his delivery to fit another producer’s beat.

The last vocal track “So Far,” also produced by Supa Dave West, will be familiar to some fans of MP3 bootlegs. On this record, it’s mastered for the first time by Dave Cooley, who worked on Donuts, The Shining and Ruff Draft.

Thanks to James & Karla Murray for the cover photo, from their book Store Front (Ginko Press). The label illustration is by Denise Nestor, based on a photo by B+. Sleeve by Jeff Jank. This was produced for reissue by Eothen Alapatt, with coordination from House Shoes, Henoch Moore and J Rocc.

Pay Jay Productions was founded by J Dilla (James Yancey). The Estate of James Yancey is administered by attorney Alex Borden and overseen by the Probate Court of the State of California on behalf of Yancey’s four heirs – his mother, Maureen “Madukes” Yancey, his brother John “Illa J” Yancey and his two daughters, Ja’Mya Yancey and Ty-monae Whitlow.

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9:12 pm

Kev Brown Threats (Instrumental) | Brown Album Instrumentals | Mecenjah Resurrected [h/t]

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9:02 pm

Powdered Alcohol is About to be a Thing
Freshly-approved by the FDA, US markets are about to get their first taste of powdered alcohol. So, basically, we’re all about to be treated to grown-up Kool Aid. I’m pretty sure I can hear Rebecca shouting with glee from Texas.
The US government has given approval to Palcohol, a patent-pending brand of powdered alcohol that would be the first of its kind (at least within the States). They’re apparently going to be available in seven flavors, from simple Rum and Vodka to more complex mixes such as Lemon Drop, Kamikaze, and Cosmopolitan, all of which the company expects to hit shelves by Fall 2014.
The funniest part is that the brand’s website acknowledges that people snorting Palcohol is a possibility, but they suggest that people buying the products “not do anything stupid with it.” OK. Sure. I’m positive that someone idiotic enough to snort crystallized Cosmopolitan is going to be dissuaded by your careful crafted “hey, don’t be dumb” argument, Palcohol. [x]

Powdered Alcohol is About to be a Thing

Freshly-approved by the FDA, US markets are about to get their first taste of powdered alcohol. So, basically, we’re all about to be treated to grown-up Kool Aid. I’m pretty sure I can hear Rebecca shouting with glee from Texas.

The US government has given approval to Palcohol, a patent-pending brand of powdered alcohol that would be the first of its kind (at least within the States). They’re apparently going to be available in seven flavors, from simple Rum and Vodka to more complex mixes such as Lemon Drop, Kamikaze, and Cosmopolitan, all of which the company expects to hit shelves by Fall 2014.

The funniest part is that the brand’s website acknowledges that people snorting Palcohol is a possibility, but they suggest that people buying the products “not do anything stupid with it.” OK. Sure. I’m positive that someone idiotic enough to snort crystallized Cosmopolitan is going to be dissuaded by your careful crafted “hey, don’t be dumb” argument, Palcohol. [x]

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8:54 pm

Moonchild Be Free | Be Free

Title track from the new release by Moonchild [x]

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8:38 pm

Scientists Find an ‘Earth Twin,’ or Perhaps a Cousin
It is a bit bigger and somewhat colder, but a planet circling a star 500 light-years away is otherwise the closest match of our home world discovered so far, astronomers announced on Thursday.
The planet, known as Kepler 186f, named after NASA’s Kepler planet-finding mission, which detected it, has a diameter of 8,700 miles, 10 percent wider than Earth, and its orbit lies within the “Goldilocks zone” of its star, Kepler 186 — not too hot, not too cold, where temperatures could allow for liquid water to flow at the surface, making it potentially hospitable for life.
“Kepler 186f is the first validated, Earth-size planet in the habitable zone of another star,” Elisa V. Quintana of the SETI Institute and NASA’s Ames Research Center in Mountain View, Calif., said at a news conference on Thursday. “It has the right size and is at the right distance to have properties similar to our home planet.”
Dr. Quintana is the lead author of a scientific paper describing the findings in this week’s issue of the journal Science. Kepler 186f is the latest planet to be sifted out of the voluminous data collected by Kepler, which kept watch over 150,000 stars, looking for slight drops in brightness when a planet passed in front.
This follows the announcement last year that another star, Kepler 62, has two planets in its habitable zone, but those two were “super Earths,” with masses probably several times that of Earth. The gravity of those planets might be strong enough to pull in helium and hydrogen gases, making them more like mini-Neptunes than large Earths.
With its smaller size, Kepler 186f is more likely to have an Earth-like rocky surface, another step in astronomers’ quest for what might be called Earth 2.0.
“It’s a progression,” said another member of the discovery team, Thomas S. Barclay of the Bay Area Environmental Research Institute. “This planet really reminds us of Earth.”
The researchers speculate that it is made of the same stuff as Earth — iron, rock, ice, liquid water, although the relative amounts could be very different.
The gravity on Kepler 186f, too, is likely to be roughly the same as Earth’s. “You could far more easily imagine someone being able to go there and walk around on the surface,” Stephen Kane, an astronomer at San Francisco State University and another member of the research team, said in an interview.
Kepler 186f is not a perfect replica, however. It is closer to its star — a red dwarf that is smaller, cooler and fainter than our sun — than the Earth is to its; its year, the time to complete one orbit, is 130 days, not 365. It is also at the outer edge of the habitable zone, receiving less warmth, so perhaps more of its surface would freeze.
“Perhaps it’s more of an Earth cousin than an Earth twin,” Dr. Barclay said.
On the other hand, with its greater mass, Kepler 186f could conceivably have a thicker, insulating atmosphere to compensate. Red dwarfs emit more of their light at the longer infrared wavelengths, which would be more readily absorbed and trapped by ice and gases like water vapor and carbon dioxide.
“This makes the planet more efficient at absorbing energy from its star to avoid freezing over,” said Victoria Meadows, an astrobiologist and planetary astronomer at the University of Washington. “Which is why this planet is still considered potentially habitable, as long as it has a dense enough atmosphere, even though it receives less light from its star than Mars does from our sun.”
She added, “It’s fun to note that if the planet is habitable, photosynthesis may be possible.”
At the wavelengths that plants need, Kepler 186f receives only about a sixth as much light as Earth does, but “there are plenty of Earth plants that would be quite happy with that,” Dr. Meadows said.
Astronomers cannot tell the exact age of the star, but such dwarfs are the longest-lived stars in the universe. If Kepler 186f is habitable, life would have had plenty of time — billions of years — to take hold.
But speculation about the planet will remain speculation for a long time, if not forever. The Kepler measurements indicated only the size of Kepler 186f. It is too far away for astronomers to discern its mass, much less whether it has an atmosphere and oceans or if it teems with living creatures.
Nonetheless, since dwarfs are the most plentiful type of star in the galaxy, astronomers are hopeful that Earth twins are plentiful, and that some will be found close by, allowing other telescopes to make temperature and mass measurements or to identify molecules in the atmosphere.
Kepler’s original mission ended last year, with the failure of equipment that kept the telescope precisely pointed, but scientists still have years of work in analyzing the data, which has so far yielded 962 confirmed planets. More than 2,800 planet candidates remain to be studied. [h/t]

Image: An artist’s concept of Kepler-186f, the first Earth-size planet found in the habitable zone, a range of distances from a star where liquid water could pool on an orbiting planet’s surface.

Scientists Find an ‘Earth Twin,’ or Perhaps a Cousin

It is a bit bigger and somewhat colder, but a planet circling a star 500 light-years away is otherwise the closest match of our home world discovered so far, astronomers announced on Thursday.

The planet, known as Kepler 186f, named after NASA’s Kepler planet-finding mission, which detected it, has a diameter of 8,700 miles, 10 percent wider than Earth, and its orbit lies within the “Goldilocks zone” of its star, Kepler 186 — not too hot, not too cold, where temperatures could allow for liquid water to flow at the surface, making it potentially hospitable for life.

“Kepler 186f is the first validated, Earth-size planet in the habitable zone of another star,” Elisa V. Quintana of the SETI Institute and NASA’s Ames Research Center in Mountain View, Calif., said at a news conference on Thursday. “It has the right size and is at the right distance to have properties similar to our home planet.”

Dr. Quintana is the lead author of a scientific paper describing the findings in this week’s issue of the journal Science. Kepler 186f is the latest planet to be sifted out of the voluminous data collected by Kepler, which kept watch over 150,000 stars, looking for slight drops in brightness when a planet passed in front.

This follows the announcement last year that another star, Kepler 62, has two planets in its habitable zone, but those two were “super Earths,” with masses probably several times that of Earth. The gravity of those planets might be strong enough to pull in helium and hydrogen gases, making them more like mini-Neptunes than large Earths.

With its smaller size, Kepler 186f is more likely to have an Earth-like rocky surface, another step in astronomers’ quest for what might be called Earth 2.0.

“It’s a progression,” said another member of the discovery team, Thomas S. Barclay of the Bay Area Environmental Research Institute. “This planet really reminds us of Earth.”

The researchers speculate that it is made of the same stuff as Earth — iron, rock, ice, liquid water, although the relative amounts could be very different.

The gravity on Kepler 186f, too, is likely to be roughly the same as Earth’s. “You could far more easily imagine someone being able to go there and walk around on the surface,” Stephen Kane, an astronomer at San Francisco State University and another member of the research team, said in an interview.

Kepler 186f is not a perfect replica, however. It is closer to its star — a red dwarf that is smaller, cooler and fainter than our sun — than the Earth is to its; its year, the time to complete one orbit, is 130 days, not 365. It is also at the outer edge of the habitable zone, receiving less warmth, so perhaps more of its surface would freeze.

“Perhaps it’s more of an Earth cousin than an Earth twin,” Dr. Barclay said.

On the other hand, with its greater mass, Kepler 186f could conceivably have a thicker, insulating atmosphere to compensate. Red dwarfs emit more of their light at the longer infrared wavelengths, which would be more readily absorbed and trapped by ice and gases like water vapor and carbon dioxide.

“This makes the planet more efficient at absorbing energy from its star to avoid freezing over,” said Victoria Meadows, an astrobiologist and planetary astronomer at the University of Washington. “Which is why this planet is still considered potentially habitable, as long as it has a dense enough atmosphere, even though it receives less light from its star than Mars does from our sun.”

She added, “It’s fun to note that if the planet is habitable, photosynthesis may be possible.”

At the wavelengths that plants need, Kepler 186f receives only about a sixth as much light as Earth does, but “there are plenty of Earth plants that would be quite happy with that,” Dr. Meadows said.

Astronomers cannot tell the exact age of the star, but such dwarfs are the longest-lived stars in the universe. If Kepler 186f is habitable, life would have had plenty of time — billions of years — to take hold.

But speculation about the planet will remain speculation for a long time, if not forever. The Kepler measurements indicated only the size of Kepler 186f. It is too far away for astronomers to discern its mass, much less whether it has an atmosphere and oceans or if it teems with living creatures.

Nonetheless, since dwarfs are the most plentiful type of star in the galaxy, astronomers are hopeful that Earth twins are plentiful, and that some will be found close by, allowing other telescopes to make temperature and mass measurements or to identify molecules in the atmosphere.

Kepler’s original mission ended last year, with the failure of equipment that kept the telescope precisely pointed, but scientists still have years of work in analyzing the data, which has so far yielded 962 confirmed planets. More than 2,800 planet candidates remain to be studied. [h/t]

Image: An artist’s concept of Kepler-186f, the first Earth-size planet found in the habitable zone, a range of distances from a star where liquid water could pool on an orbiting planet’s surface.

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8:19 pm
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8:08 pm
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Never-before-seen African-American artifacts creating a buzz in Atlanta

The nationally acclaimed exhibition, The Kinsey Collection, is in Atlanta for the first time since its inception.

The exhibit at the Atlanta History Center is creating a buzz, in part because it features never before displayed artifacts, including an early edition of Solomon Northup’s 12 Years a Slave.

“A young man called me eight months ago about a stack of books his uncle had been collecting for 75, 80 years,” said philanthropist and avid collector Bernard Kinsey, who began the collection over 35 years ago, along with his wife Shirley.

“We purchased these books about a month before the Oscars, really not thinking about 12 Years a Slave quite being so impactful. We got it because it’s really one of the first-person slave narratives that’s important to be in our collection.”

Aside from Northrup’s harrowing memoir, which inspired the Oscar-winning movie, W.E.B Du Bois’s first edition copy of his groundbreaking book, The Souls of Black Folk, is also on public display for the first time ever.

In fact, out of 130 items at the Atlanta History Center, on display through July 13, there are at least 15 new artifacts, which include the earliest known African-American marriage record dating back to 1598.

“We have another book that has never been shown outside the house,” said Mr. Kinsey. “A personally autographed book from Mrs. Rosa Parks to Shirley [Kinsey].”

Bernard Kinsey’s wife Shirley said their collection continues to pull in the crowds because the exhibits are changed to fit the city.

“It always brings out somebody who’s connected to something,” she said.

The couple has amassed one of the largest private collections of artwork and artifacts tracing African-American history spanning more than 400 years.

The Kinsey Collection, which now has around 400 items, includes everything from rare art, photographs and manuscripts that showcase African-American achievement and contribution. The idea is to dispel myths and promote dialogue about the role of black Americans in the making of America.

The exhibits have been viewed by close to 14 million visitors in 15 cities across the United States.

Some of the most notable items include letters by Zora Neale Hurston and Martin Luther King Jr., correspondence between Malcolm X and his biographer Alex Haley, slave shackles, a first-edition copy of poems by Phillis Wheatley, and 17th-century slave documents.

The exhibition has been on national tour since 2006. Since then, The Kinsey Collection: Shared Treasures of Bernard and Shirley Kinsey has been on display at numerous museums, including in the Smithsonian National Museum of American History. The EPCOT Center has roughly 40 pieces at any given time on a rotating basis through 2016.

Mr. Kinsey said from his experience “children and young people are deeply affected by the collection.” It raises their self-esteem and gives them a new sense of purpose, he said.

“We’ve had over 150,000 students come to The Kinsey Collection. We believe from what we’ve been able to see and from the surveys and testimonials, when young African-Americans learn more about their history they change their behavior. That is something we found gratifying, particularly with our son Khalil.”

This latest incarnation is part of an extended nationwide tour in collaboration with Wells Fargo. The exhibition moves to Houston once it finishes its Atlanta run.

Lisa Frison, VP African-American segment leader at Wells Fargo, said the ongoing partnership with the family was initiated by a chance meeting with Bernard and Shirley’s only son, Khalil.

“It was fortuitous in the timing because we were looking for a way to celebrate the 150th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation and we really wanted to do it in a way that was unique and authentic,” said Frison. “We had a shared vision to tell the story of African-American history being part of the fabric of American history and the Kinsey Collection was a great way for us to do that.”

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7:13 pm

Flatbush ZOMBiES LiT | It’s All A Matter of Perspective EP

Produced By: The Architect
Mixed By: Leon Kelly & The Architect
Additional Vox: Yasmin
Bass Gtr: Mitch

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7:08 pm

Kool G Rap on Juan Epstein f. Necro | rosenbergradio

Hmmm how classic is this? Well did you know G Rap was part of the start of Nas? Do you want to hear his top 10 MC list? I would listen in to this one. Shout to Necro for coming by too…their project drops soon!

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7:00 pm

Matthewdavid In My World | In My World

Release date: 07/01/14

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