5:43 am - Fri, Apr 18, 2014
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Orange Is The New Black | Season 2 | Official Trailer

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11:02 pm - Thu, Apr 17, 2014
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kenobi-wan-obi:

Astrophysicist Helps Crack A Black Hole Mystery: Energy Jets

With almost limitless gravitational power, black holes are supposed to gulp everything that comes near them, even weightless light photons.

So astronomers have long sought explanations for observations that black holes emit high-energy particles, often through visually impressive jets that unfurl from the black holes’ poles in thick, tornado-like coils. Now, in a paper published in this month’s edition of the Astrophysical Journal, a University of Florida researcher has bolstered and expanded a longtime theory about how and why these photons and electrons escape powerful gape of black holes, caused by the collapse of stars.

“My calculations may solve the mystery as to where the large number of high-energy observed electrons originate from,” said Reva Kay Williams, a UF courtesy postdoctoral associate. “My calculations also help explain some of our observations, such as why many (black hole) jets are observed to be uneven, or one-sided.”

Williams’ research is the first to prove the Penrose mechanism, a 35-year-old theory named for its author, Oxford University mathematics and physics professor Roger Penrose. It also provides a new, physical explanation for the odd appearance of many of the jets, which some astronomers believe was merely the result of an optical illusion.

Fernando de Felice, a physicist at the University of Padova in Italy, said Williams’ findings represent an important contribution to the field.

“Until recently, it was believed that the Penrose mechanism was not very efficient for generating energetic particles, but Dr. Williams’ detailed and perseverant work showed that this may not be true and, to the contrary, that it may be relevant to high-energy astrophysics,” he said.

Penrose’s theory says the rotational energy of a spinning black hole powers and lifts particles large distances away. Williams’ research, based in part on computer modeling, shows these particles appear to be created at the part of the hole where gravity is so powerful it bends light into a circle around the hole.

Her calculations also suggest the one-sided appearance of the jets is the result of the black holes’ gravitational dragging of space and time near their cores – not just, as some suggested, a consequence of the observer’s position relative to the jets. “The interest in Dr. Williams’ work is that it has enriched the possibilities of having energy output in active cosmic sources,” de Felice said.

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7:07 pm

Emanuelle Araújo Southern Freeez | Brasil Bam Bam Bam

Taken from Gilles Peterson’s new album project Sonzeira, Southern Freeez, featuring Emanuelle Araújo on vocals, is an electronic bossa re-work of Freeez’s famous UK jazz-funk hit, due for exclusive release on 7” for Record Store Day Saturday 19th April.

The album Sonzeira – Brasil Bam Bam Bam features all new material produced by Gilles Peterson and is the product of him being a fan and a champion of Brazilian music in the club and on the radio for last 25 years; culminating in him bringing together the country’s finest artists all on one record for the very first time - under the artist collective Sonzeira.

Brasil Bam Bam Bam is released 19th May.

Amazon pre-order for standard physical album. po.st/bambambam

Watch the album trailer here po.st/IntroBBam

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6:57 pm
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Drums Shed | GospelChops.com

DRUMS: Fred Boswell Jr., Anthony Burns, Tim “Figg” Newton, and Quintin Gulledge

KEYS: Terry Harris Jr., Quintin Gulledge

BASS: Ryan Brown

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6:50 pm
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Dres Bars In The Booth (Session 2) (prod. DJ Premier) [h/t]

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6:37 pm
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6:25 pm
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5:59 pm
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Are Touchscreens Melting Your Kid’s Brain?
Children today are surrounded by screen upon screen upon screen: second screens, third screens, screens on our wrists and even our faces. It’s not uncommon to have one in every room. Screen time—especially if you’re talking about touchscreens—is a perplexing issue all modern parents have to confront.
The American Academy of Pediatrics is unequivocal: If your kid is under 2, no screens. For older kids, two hours a day, max. But the AAP doesn’t differentiate between activities; education apps, base-jumping videos, first-person shooters, ebooks, Sesame Street, and The Shining are all thrown into the same bucket. It’s all just screen time.
Trouble is, they’re not all the same. An app that teaches your kid his ABCs isn’t the same as a television cartoon, but the AAP is probably right to be conservative with its advice. “Researchers know almost nothing about the impact of touchscreen technology on young children,” says Heather Kirkorian, an assistant professor of human development and family studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison who is trying to find some answers. “Our society is running a large-scale experiment with real children in the real world, and we won’t know the impact, if any, for many years to come.”
Comforting! All the more so because keeping kids away from touchscreens these days is harder than keeping them away from candy. The screens have become one of our cultural platforms—the modern agora where we get our music, movies, books, social interactions, games, and even education.
We’ve made touchscreens joyous. They are so wonderfully intuitive that even the smallest children—and pets!—can navigate them. They transcend language, and who hasn’t seen children fluent in the iOS interface before they can speak? According to the Joan Ganz Cooney Center, a research lab that focuses on children’s education and new media forms, nearly two-thirds of 2- to 10-year-olds in the US have access to a tablet or e-reader.
But the ever-present touchscreens make me incredibly uneasy—probably because they make parenting so easy. There is always one at hand to make restaurants and long drives and air travel much more pleasant. The tablet is the new pacifier.
But these screens have a weird dual nature: They make us more connected and more isolated at the same time. When I hand my daughter an iPad with an interactive reading app, she dives in and reads along. But she also goes into a trance. It’s disturbing because, frankly, it reminds me of myself.
I’m perpetually distracted, staring into my hand, ignoring the people around me. Hit Refresh and get a reward, monkey. Feed the media and it will nourish you with @replies and Likes until you’re hungry and bleary and up way too late alone in bed, locked in the feedback loop. What will my daughter’s loop look like? I’m afraid to find out.
So what’s a parent to do? I could deny my daughter a mainstay of modern life or let her dive into a world of unknown consequences. But there’s a third way for us all. We can use some common sense and deploy the same parenting tool we apply to every other indulgence or stimulus: moderation. And while we’re at it, we should think about applying it to ourselves.

Are Touchscreens Melting Your Kid’s Brain?

Children today are surrounded by screen upon screen upon screen: second screens, third screens, screens on our wrists and even our faces. It’s not uncommon to have one in every room. Screen time—especially if you’re talking about touchscreens—is a perplexing issue all modern parents have to confront.

The American Academy of Pediatrics is unequivocal: If your kid is under 2, no screens. For older kids, two hours a day, max. But the AAP doesn’t differentiate between activities; education apps, base-jumping videos, first-person shooters, ebooks, Sesame Street, and The Shining are all thrown into the same bucket. It’s all just screen time.

Trouble is, they’re not all the same. An app that teaches your kid his ABCs isn’t the same as a television cartoon, but the AAP is probably right to be conservative with its advice. “Researchers know almost nothing about the impact of touchscreen technology on young children,” says Heather Kirkorian, an assistant professor of human development and family studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison who is trying to find some answers. “Our society is running a large-scale experiment with real children in the real world, and we won’t know the impact, if any, for many years to come.”

Comforting! All the more so because keeping kids away from touchscreens these days is harder than keeping them away from candy. The screens have become one of our cultural platforms—the modern agora where we get our music, movies, books, social interactions, games, and even education.

We’ve made touchscreens joyous. They are so wonderfully intuitive that even the smallest children—and pets!—can navigate them. They transcend language, and who hasn’t seen children fluent in the iOS interface before they can speak? According to the Joan Ganz Cooney Center, a research lab that focuses on children’s education and new media forms, nearly two-thirds of 2- to 10-year-olds in the US have access to a tablet or e-reader.

But the ever-present touchscreens make me incredibly uneasy—probably because they make parenting so easy. There is always one at hand to make restaurants and long drives and air travel much more pleasant. The tablet is the new pacifier.

But these screens have a weird dual nature: They make us more connected and more isolated at the same time. When I hand my daughter an iPad with an interactive reading app, she dives in and reads along. But she also goes into a trance. It’s disturbing because, frankly, it reminds me of myself.

I’m perpetually distracted, staring into my hand, ignoring the people around me. Hit Refresh and get a reward, monkey. Feed the media and it will nourish you with @replies and Likes until you’re hungry and bleary and up way too late alone in bed, locked in the feedback loop. What will my daughter’s loop look like? I’m afraid to find out.

So what’s a parent to do? I could deny my daughter a mainstay of modern life or let her dive into a world of unknown consequences. But there’s a third way for us all. We can use some common sense and deploy the same parenting tool we apply to every other indulgence or stimulus: moderation. And while we’re at it, we should think about applying it to ourselves.

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5:55 pm
3 notes
US Airways wasn’t trending nationwide before they sent an angry customer a photo of a toy plane inside a vagina.

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5:51 pm
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